Laboratories

NYCEP faculty direct cutting-edge laboratories specializing in anthropological genetics, primate nutritional ecology, skeletal biology, and functional anatomy.


Anthropological Genetics Laboratory

Dr. Michael Steiper directs the Anthropological Genetics Laboratory (AGL) at Hunter College. The mission of the AGL is to conduct genetics research into questions of anthropological significance and train students in relevant techniques.


Laboratory of Human and Primate Evolutionary Genetics

Dr. Ryan Raaum directs the Laboratory of Human and Primate Evolutionary Genetics at Lehman College. Work in this laboratory is focused on gaining insight into fundamental questions in evolutionary genetics using computational and statistical analyses of human and primate population genetic data.


Molecular Primatology Laboratory

Dr. Todd Disotell directs the Molecular Primatology Laboratory at New York University. Research in this laboratory is centered upon the theme of primate and human evolution, at all levels from the populational to the supra-ordinal.


Nutritional Ecology Laboratory

Dr. Jessica Rothman directs the Nutritional Ecology Laboratory at Hunter College, with equipment to analyze primate foods for basic nutrients (protein, sugar, fiber, fat, ash, energy) and some secondary compounds, such as tannins and alkaloids.


Paleoanthropology, Skeletal Biology, and Comparative Morphology Laboratories

NYU has a suite of specialized and well-equipped laboratories for the study of human evolution, comparative morphology and human osteology. Highlights include an extensive collection of human, non-human primate and vertebrate skeletons, the Daris Swindler Primate dental cast collection (with more than 2000 primate casts), and a comprehensive collection of fossil hominin casts. The labs are equipped with computer workstations, as well as morphometric, 3D scanning, and image analysis tools.


Primate Hormones and Behavior Laboratory

Dr. James Higham directs the Primate Hormones and Behavior Laboratory (PHaB Lab) at New York University. Research in this laboratory is focused on understanding the underlying physiology of primate sociality, behavior, patterns of signal expression, and life-history.