NYCEP Alumnus Profile

Luke Matthews

Behavioral/Social Scientist RAND Corporation

Education

B.S. 2002, Indiana University of Pennsylvania M.A. 2005, New York University Ph.D. 2008, New York University Postdoctoral Fellow 2008-2011, Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

Contact

Email:

Overview of Research

Luke Matthews is a behavioral and social scientist at the RAND Corporation. His work focuses on applied uses of statistical models for cultural diffusion and inheritance. Matthews first studied cultural diffusion in the social networks of capuchin monkeys in the Ecuadorian Amazon. He subsequently studied diffusion dynamics in systems ranging from ancient human migrations to contemporaneous Christian groups before bringing his experience to the applied sector. His applied work has used both qualitative and quantitative data to examine how cultural transmission influences a variety of decisions including religious violence and management of patient referrals by physicians. Matthews' research has been featured in New Scientist, The Washington Post, and The New York Times. He holds a Doctorate in anthropology from New York University. Prior to RAND, Matthews was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University and worked in private industry for a startup social network analytics company.

Publications

 

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Matthews, L. J. 2012. Cultural inheritance or cultural diffusion of religious violence? A quantitative case study of the Radical Reformation. Religion, Brain, & Behavior. [early view online].

Matthews, L. J. 2012. The recognition signal hypothesis for the adaptive evolution of religion: a phylogenetic test with Christian denominations. Human Nature. 23:218-249.

Matthews, L. J. 2012. Variations in sexual behavior among capuchin monkeys function for conspecific mate recognition: a phylogenetic analysis and a new hypothesis for female proceptivity in tufted capuchins. American Journal of Primatology. 74:287-298.

Alfaro, J. W., L. Matthews, A. H. Boyette, S. J. Macfarlan, K. A. Phillips, T. Falótico, E. Ottoni, M. Verderane, P. Izar, M. Schulte, A. Melin, L. Fedigan, C. Janson, and M. E. Alfaro. 2012. Anointing variation across wild capuchin populations: a review of material preferences, bout frequency and anointing sociality in Cebus and Sapujus. American Journal of Primatology. 74:299-314.

Griffin, R. H., L. J. Matthews, and C. L. Nunn. 2012. Evolutionary disequilibrium and activity period in primates: a Bayesian phylogenetic approach. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 147:409-416.

MacLean, E.L., L. J. Matthews, B. A. Hare, C. L. Nunn, R. C. Anderson, F. Aureli, E. M. Brannon, J. Call, C. M. Drea, N. J. Emery, D. B. M. Haun, E. Herrmann, L. F. Jacobs, M. L. Platt, A. G. Rosati, A. A. Sandel, K. K. Schroepfer, A. M. Seed, J. Tan, C. P. van Schaik, V. Wobber. 2012. How does cognition evolve? Phylogenetic comparative psychology. Animal Cognition. 15:223-238.

Matthews, L. J., C. Arnold, Z. Machanda, and C. L. Nunn. 2011. Primate extinction risk and historical patterns of speciation and extinction in relation to body mass. Proceedings of the Royal Society, Series B. 278:1256-1263.

Matthews, L. J., P. M. Butler. 2011. Novelty-seeking DRD4 polymorphisms are associated with human migration distance out-of-Africa after controlling for neutral population gene structure. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 145: 382-389.

Matthews, L. J., F. Jordan, M. Collard, C. L. Nunn, and J. J. Tehrani. 2011. Testing for divergent transmission histories among cultural characters: a study using Bayesian phylogenetic methods and Iranian tribal textile data. PLoSONE. 6: e14810.

Matthews, L. J., A. Paukner, and S. J. Suomi. 2010. Can traditions emerge from the interaction of stimulus enhancement and reinforcement learning? An experimental model. American Anthropologist. 112:257-269.

Arnold, C., L. J. Matthews, and C. L. Nunn. 2010. The 10kTrees website: a new online resource for primate phylogeny. Evolutionary Anthropology. 19:114-118.

Franz, M. and L. J. Matthews. 2010. Social enhancement can create adaptive, arbitrary and maladaptive cultural traditions. Proceedings of the Royal Society, Series B. 277:3363-3372.

Nunn, C. L., C. Arnold, L. J. Matthews, and M. Borgerhoff Mulder. 2010. Simulating Trait Evolution for Cross-Cultural Comparison. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. 365:3807-3819.

Matthews, L. J. 2009. Activity patterns, home range size, and intergroup encounters in Cebus albifrons support existing models of capuchin socioecology. International Journal of Primatology. 30:709-728.

Matthews, L. J. 2009. Intragroup behavioral variation in white-fronted capuchin monkeys (Cebus albifrons): mixed evidence for social learning from new and established analytical methods. Behaviour. 146:295-324.

Hodgson, J. A., K. N. Sterner, L. J. Matthews, A. S. Burrell, R. L. Raaum, C. B. Stewart, and T. R. Disotell. 2009. Successive radiations, not stasis, in the South American primate fauna. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA. 106:5534-5539.

Matthews, L. J. and A. L. Rosenberger. 2008. Taxon combinations, parsimony analysis (PAUP*), and the taxonomy of the yellow-tailed woolly monkey, Lagothrix flavicauda. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 137:245-255.

Rosenberger, A. L. and L. J. Matthews. 2008. Oreonax – not a genus. Neotropical Primates. 1:8-12.
 

Invited Presentations

Matthews, L. J. October 2010. Cultural inheritance and the evolution of primate behavior: parallel patterns with genetics. George Washington University, Department of Anthropology, Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology (CASHP).

Matthews, L. J. and P. M. Butler. September 2010. Novelty-seeking DRD4 polymorphisms are associated with human migration distance out-of-Africa after controlling for neutral population gene structure. N. Christakis lab group, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School.

Matthews, L. J. June 2010. Genetic and cultural inheritance in the evolution of primate behavior. National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, India.

Matthews, L. J. April 2010. Cultural inheritance mechanisms and the evolution of primate behavior. Department of Anthropology, New Mexico State University.

Matthews, L. J. and M. Franz. January 2010. Distinguishing tree-like descent from ongoing network transmission in putatively cultural data. N. Christakis lab group, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School.

Matthews, L. J. 2008. Field experiments of an extractive processing task in wild white-fronted capuchin monkeys (Cebus albifrons). Conference Symposium – Field experiments: The challenges and benefits of using experimental methods in field research.  International Primatological Society XXII Congress.
 

Presentations and Published Abstracts

Matthews, L. J. 2012. Recognition signals in Christian denominations as mechanisms that enable cooperation: a comparative and phylogenetic approach. American Anthropological Association, 110th Annual Meeting.

Matthews, L. J., and C. L. Nunn. 2011. Using phylogenies and social networks to detect the modality of disease transmission in wild primate social groups. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement. 144: 208-209.

Russo, G. A., J. W. Young, and L. J. Matthews. 2011. Ontogeny of caudal vertebral structure in capuchin monkeys (Cebus albifrons and C. apella). American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement. 144: 259-260.

Matthews, L. J., C. Arnold, and C. L. Nunn. 2010. Niche construction and the evolution of primate sex-biased dispersal patterns. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement. 141:166.

Arnold, C., L. J. Matthews, and C. L. Nunn. 2010. The 10kTrees Project: a new inference of primate phylogeny for comparative studies. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement. 141:58.

Franz, M. and L. J. Matthews. 2010. Social enhancement can create adaptive, arbitrary and maladaptive cultural traditions. European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association, 5th Annual Conference.

Matthews, L. J. 2009. Organizer and Chair of session – Social learning and development in an evolutionary context: adapted mechanisms and emerging patterns of tradition. American Anthropological Association, 108th Annual Meeting.

Matthews, L. J. 2009. Simple social learning mechanisms are sufficient to produce foraging traditions in capuchin monkeys (genus Cebus). Presented at: American Anthropological Association, 108th Annual Meeting.

Matthews, L. J. 2009. Cluster analysis and social network theory applied to the study of socially learned traditions in primates. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement. 138:256.

Montague, M. J. and L. J. Matthews. 2009. Why do capuchin and squirrel monkeys form interspecific associations? A GIS based test using ranging and feeding data. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement. 138:265-266.

Matthews, L. J. 2008. Ranging behavior of white-fronted capuchins (Cebus albifrons) in the Ecuadorian Amazon: effects of resource use and intergroup interactions. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement. 46:151.

Hodgson, J. A., K. N. Sterner, L. J. Matthews, R. Jani, C. B. Stewart, and T. R. Disotell. 2008. Phylogenetic relationship of the Platyrrhini inferred from complete mitochondrial genome sequences. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement. 46:118-119.

Matthews, L. J. and C. A. Schmitt. 2007. Courtship behaviors of genus Cebus: a test case for inferences from phylogeny. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement. 44:166.

Schmitt, C. A., A. Di Fiore, A. Link, L. J. Matthews, M. J. Montague, A. M. Derby, D. Hurst, G. Carrillo, C. Sendall, M. Y. Field, and E. Fernandez-Duque. 2007. Comparative ranging behavior of eight species of primates in a western Amazonian rainforest. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement. 44:208-209.

Matthews, L. J.  2005. A behavioral phylogeny of the platyrrhines. Presented at “Monkeys: Old and New,” a symposium sponsored by the New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology.